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Grocery Store Melt down

Posted on March 27, 2017 at 10:10 PM

You are walking through the grocery store. It doesn’t matter which one or even what city. You are either there for one thing or for many things. There it is, that sound you hope you don’t hear, a child screaming or baby crying. Do you sneer at the mother or father? Do you tell them to control you children? Or, are you the mother or father of the screaming child?

I caught myself the other day walking through our local Wal-Mart listening to a child crying and my first thought was “Can you please keep your child quite!” Wait! What? Did I just really think this? What in the world are you thinking? I have two kids of my own and I understand how the parents feel. The stares, glimpses, sneers, and rude comments don’t help.

I’ve been there. In fact I was there today. All day! The kids had moments where they get along and some where they just couldn’t stand each other. I was doing well today. I felt like this mom thing was going well. Then we decided to go to the store and everything just broke.

I explained going in that we were not going to buy any toys, we were there to get shorts and yogurt. That’s a weird combo, but it’s true. So mom bladder kicks in and we take off to the family restroom in the back of the store. Well guess what is on the way? The toy department, so what does my son want to do? Look at the toys. I explain that I am going to the bathroom and then we are going to check out and go home. Of course that causes a major break down.

Walking through the store with “that kid” who is crying and causing a scene, he gets so heated that he actually got the “concerned look” from people. Was I embarrassed? I was “that parent,” and I wasn’t embarrassed. Here’s the thing, ADHD comes in many forms, no one case looks the same. He doesn’t work well through his emotions and sometimes trying to talk to him only makes it worse. I chose not to engage, checked out, and walked out of the store. He calmed down once we got home, I am learning to choose my battles and look for the key factor to defuse them.

When my husband got home we had dinner, gave the kids a bath, and sent both kids to bed early. I told my husband, “I would just like one day of complete obedience, of them getting along, and doing what is expected of them.” Then my brain flipped and said, “How do you think God feels?” I get it now! Babies are born selfish. They need their mom for everything. They grow up with “mine” on the brain. We have to teach them not to be selfish. How do I teach my children to not be, when I am the very personification of selfish? “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves.” Philippians 2:3.

Deuteronomy 5:33 says, “Walk in obedience to all that the Lord your God has commanded you, so that you may live and prosper and prolong your days in the land that you will possess.” Deuteronomy 8:6 (NIV) goes on to say, “Observe the commands of the Lord your God, walking in obedience to Him and revering Him.” Walk in obedience. Revere (respect or admire) Him. I need to work on my obedience to God and set an example for my kids! “As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance.” 1 Peter 1:14. Oh Lord, I don’t want to live in ignorance any longer; I want to be less selfish, and to live in obedience. For my children, I choose to be obedient.

 

Categories: Family

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2 Comments

Reply Jess
2:57 PM on March 29, 2017 
Your right "normal" is a bad term. Some kids just have a different way of life, we all do. Children with ADD/ADHD, their brains are wired differently than ours. We as their parents have to find out how they are wired and learn to understand where they are coming from in order to get through to them. I think we have to help those who don't understand. I know that it could be like talking to a brick wall.
It isn't the child's fault or the parents fault. This is how God made them. I think when we finally except that and we stop apologizing for the way they act (sometimes they cant help it themselves) we can live a somewhat "normal" life.

Rebecca says...
As a mother with a child who has ADHD I can not agree more. Learning what things cause them greater agony and learning what things are best for defusing those situations, is a lot harder than a parent of a "Normal" ( I hate that term) child would ever understand or care to understand. They will always continue to snicker and stare until the day they too understand! Very nice!!
Reply Rebecca
1:29 PM on March 29, 2017 
As a mother with a child who has ADHD I can not agree more. Learning what things cause them greater agony and learning what things are best for defusing those situations, is a lot harder than a parent of a "Normal" ( I hate that term) child would ever understand or care to understand. They will always continue to snicker and stare until the day they too understand! Very nice!!